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  • Composite geographical context and school choice attitudes in Sweden : a study based on individually defined, scalable neighborhoods
  • Children ; Education ; Ethnic composition ; Family ; Neighbourhood ; Neighbourhood effect ; Primary education ; School choice ; Social geography ; Sweden
  • This article uses a novel approach to the measurement of geographical context to analyze neighborhood influences on school choice attitudes among Swedish parents. The results show that parental motives for choosing schools in Sweden are strongly
  • influenced by the social and ethnic composition of their own and their adjacent neighborhoods. Thus, parents living in academic, high-income areas put little stress on attending an assigned school, close-to-home schools, or stating that the municipality has
  • 2014
  • Disparities in accessibility of public high schools, in metropolitan Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1990–2010
  • Accessibility ; Education ; Geographical information system ; Louisiana ; Public sector ; Race ; Secondary education ; Time-distance ; United States of America
  • This study uses a Geographic Information System-based index to measure spatial accessibility of public high schools. The index is applied to the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Statistical Area in 1990, 2000, and 2010. Overall, urban areas had consistently
  • worse accessibility scores compared with suburban and rural areas. High schools with more African American students tended to have poorer accessibility levels. Schools with lower accessibility tended to be associated with poorer average student
  • performance, and the effect strengthened between 2000 and 2010. In developing a better understanding of the accessibility of public high schools, this paper reaffirms the significance of space, place, and race, and challenges the notion of declining relevance
  • 2014
  • [b2] School of Urban and Environmental Studies, Yunnan Univ. of Finance and Economics, Kunming, Chine
  • Block, neighbourhood or district ? the importance of geographical scale for area effects on educational attainment
  • District ; Education ; Neighbourhood ; Norway ; Oslo ; Primary education ; School system ; Secondary education ; Urban area ; Young people
  • This study examines adolescent development, with educational attainment as the dependent variable. It further addresses contextual effects that emerge at different intra-urban geographical scales by exploring spatial effects at block, neighbourhood
  • and district level in Oslo, Norway. The results reveal significant effects on the youth's future educational attainment at all geographical levels and for all tested measures of social and demographic area composition. They also show that the highest
  • geographical level (district) has the strongest effect. This surprising result is tentatively interpreted to emerge from a combination of three interwoven mechanisms: the youths' extended activity spaces and social interactions, the institutional aspects
  • (schools), and place stigmatization.
  • 2014
  • British School Atlases, 1880–1930: Questions of Relevance, Credibility and Authorship in the Production of Geographical Knowledge
  • Bartholomew Archive ; E. R. Wethey. ; England ; Geographical Association ; George Phillip ; History of cartography ; John George Bartholomew ; Karl Reginald Cramp ; Nineteenth Century ; Royal Geographical Society ; School atlas ; School atlases
  • ; Twentieth Century ; United Kingdom ; atlas publishing ; audiences ; authorship ; book history ; credibility ; geographers
  • 1880–1930. Particular attention is paid to the efforts of mapmakers, publishers, geographers and other professionals to ensure the relevance of the maps selected in school atlases for specific audiences, to guarantee the credibility of the information
  • pour les écoles du Royaume-Uni et des parties de l’Empire. On porte une attention particulière aux efforts des cartographes, éditeurs, géographes et autres professionnels pour s'assurer de la pertinence des cartes choisies dans les atlas scolaires pour
  • un public spécifique, ainsi qu’à la crédibilité de l'information transmise et aux tractations relatives aux auteurs.#The focus in this article is on school atlases produced in Britain in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries and on what
  • on the business and personal activities of one of the leading producers of school atlases, the local firm of John Bartholomew and Son, which was active in map making and publishing between 1880 and 1987. The sociology and pattern of communication of publishing
  • , explored by book historians and historians of science, geography and cartography in other contexts, are here considered in relation to the atlases that were produced in Britain for schools in the United Kingdom and in other parts of the Empire in the period
  • 2014
  • Making their own futures? Research change and diversity amongst contemporary British human geographers
  • Connaissance ; Enseignement supérieur ; Géographe ; Géographie humaine ; Interdisciplinarité ; Politique de la recherche ; Recherche ; Recherche géographique ; Royaume-Uni
  • Geographer ; Geographic research ; Higher education ; Human geography ; Inter-disciplinary approach ; Knowledge ; Research ; United Kingdom
  • The paper discusses a survey of British academic human geographers enquiring about change and diversification within personal research activities, their nature, motivations and impacts. The findings highlight the range of motivations underpinning
  • research change, its impacts and mediation through the institutional context of British human geography. It concludes that despite a more prescriptive institutional context geographers have a degree of autonomy, albeit somewhat fettered, to shape their own
  • 2014
  • [b1] School of Natural and Social Sciences, Univ. of Gloucestershire, Cheltenham, Royaume-Uni
  • Demand ; Distance ; Economy ; Facilities ; Geographical information system ; Location ; Regional analysis
  • is proposed that is integrated through geographical information system (GIS) functionality. Empirical results highlight the advantages of the developed approach and the importance of solution integration with GIS.
  • 2014
  • [b1] GeoDa Center for Geospatial Analysis and Computation, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, Etats-Unis
  • Cartographie ; Géographe ; Géographie physique ; Italie ; MARINELLI (G.) ; MARINELLI (O.) ; Recherche ; Siècle 19 ; Siècle 20
  • Cartography ; Geographer ; Italy ; Nineteenth Century ; Physical geography ; Research ; Twentieth Century
  • . Their contribution was principally in physical geography and in the role played by cartography in describing and understanding relations between people and their environment. Most Italian geographers accepted their theoretical and methodological approach for a long
  • time after their death; indeed, the influence of the Marinellis is still recognizable in the teaching of geography. Some scholars have introduced the term ‘Scuola Friulana’ (the Friulian School) to connote their conjoint scientific approach and its
  • 2014
  • The geographical dimension of innovation collaboration : networking and innovation in Norway
  • This paper examines the impact of manager-level, firm-level and regional-level variables on the decisions of firms to collaborate with partners at different levels of geographical distance. The results indicate that collaboration is affected
  • 2014
  • [b2] London School of Economics, London, Royaume-Uni
  • Staying with the system : theoretical consistency and change in Danish geographical work on the Sahel
  • Africa ; Environment ; Geographic school ; Global change ; Land use ; Man-environment relations ; Research ; Sahel ; Scientific publication
  • 2014
  • Archeological site ; China ; Climatic change ; Eastern China ; Geographical information system ; Holocene ; Palaeo-environment ; Prehistory ; Sea level ; Space time ; Spatial analysis ; Zhejiang
  • 2014
  • [b2] School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Chine
  • [b3] Geographic Information and Tourism College, Univ., Chuzhou, Chine
  • [b4] School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Univ., Nanjing, Chine
  • 2014
  • [b1] School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, Etats-Unis
  • [b2] School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, Etats-Unis
  • [b4] School of Sustainability, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, Etats-Unis
  • This article analyzes how well-being is associated with geographical context, social contacts, and life circumstances in Hong Kong. First, it finds that life satisfaction is associated more strongly with geographical context than is momentary well
  • 2014
  • [b1] Transport Studies Unit, School of Geography and the Environment, Univ., Oxford, Royaume-Uni
  • . The Geographically weighted regression model shows that accessibility varies significantly over geographical space demonstrating the advantages of this approach.
  • 2014
  • [b1] ITLS, Business School, Univ., Sydney, Australie
  • Architecture ; Geographical imagination ; Kazakhstan ; Modernity ; Modernization ; Power ; Role of the State ; Social class ; Social exclusion ; Social geography ; Urbanism
  • the exclusionary practices of elites and non-elites alike. Taking the case of Kazakhstan's new capital city, Astana, it examines how the state-led urban modernisation agenda simultaneously draws upon and re-inscribes a set of interlocking popular geographic
  • 2014
  • [b1] Dept. of Geography, The Maxwell School, Univ., Syracuse, Etats-Unis
  • Performative research for a climate politics of hope : rethinking geographic scale, “impact” scale, and markets
  • 2014
  • [b1] Discipline of Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, Univ. of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australie
  • Designing robust coverage systems : a maximal covering model with geographically varying failure probabilities
  • better the underlying geographic processes that cause facility failures. It is posed as a spatial optimization problem using integer linear programming. This article compares two different formulations of the covering model and discuss their properties
  • 2014
  • [b2] School of Geography and Development, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, Etats-Unis
  • 2014
  • [b3] School of Geographic Sciences, Nanjing Normal Univ., Nanjing, Chine
  • [b4] School of Economics and Management, Institute of Technology, Yancheng, Chine
  • 2014
  • [b1] Asian Pacific American Studies / School of Social Transformation, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, Etats-Unis
  • 2014
  • [b1] School of Geographical Sciences, Univ., Bristol, Royaume-Uni
  • . It concludes by suggesting that geographers need to reconsider their understanding of digital images and be as attentive to the interfaces embedded in the image as to the CGI’s visual content.
  • 2014
  • [b2] School of Social Sciences, Brunel Univ., Uxbridge, Royaume-Uni